Animation by Kayelle Allen at The Author's Secret

Wednesday, November 24, 2021

The Only 5 Things That Will Actually Motivate Me to Write by Guest Author Savannah Cordova (@savannahcordova)



If there’s one thing we scribblers know, it’s that writing is
hard. It’s even harder if you’re a chronic procrastinator like me, and harder still if bad habits were formed in youth. You think you can skate by on minimal effort forever — and then you crash into the wall of real life.

This is what happened to me when I entered the workforce as a content writer. No longer could I hem and haw over English essays, or dive back into my WIP whenever I felt like it. Now I had to regularly produce thoughtful content that I couldn’t BS my way through.

I needed to change my work patterns, and I knew it would take drastic measures. To that end, I developed these five tactics to kill my unproductivity — and I’m sharing them today in the hopes that they might help you as well!

1. Ensuring that distraction is not an option

First off, when it’s time to start writing, I literally remove every single distraction from my purview. I
work at a small table facing a window, with my back to the rest of the room. There’s nothing on the table except my laptop and coffee. And I use noise-cancelling headphones to keep from listening to my partner’s work calls instead of my inner creative voice.
 

If I know I’m going to be extra distraction-prone — often just as I’m starting a new project — I even make sure to have all my chores done the day before. That way, I can’t use the “productive procrastination” line to delay my writing, nor will I be distracted thinking about chores. 

This segues into what actually tends to be the bigger problem for me, and I imagine for most writers: digital distraction. A minimalist workspace is all well and good, but it won’t save you from the perils of the internet! So when I have to make serious writing progress, I block distracting sites and put my Freedom.to into “Locked Mode”.

Yes, some days I still have to turn off my WiFi completely. But 95% of the time, blocking those distracting sites does the trick. The mere knowledge that Twitter isn’t an option lends me the fortitude I need to focus.

2. Having someone else rely on me

Then again, sometimes it’s not enough to remove external distractions; sometimes you need external motivation as well. For me, this often manifests in the form of another person — specifically, someone who’s relying on me to get my work done. 

Of course, you can’t always contrive this in your writing process. But I have learned to take advantage of it wherever possible, often collaborating with people on longer writing projects. It turns out that splitting work is not only more manageable from a quantity perspective, but also more personally incentivizing! 

You may not typically work with others on your writing, but in my experience, it’s worth a try. If you’re struggling, rope in a friend or colleague! Even creating an outline together will force you to think about the structure and get you a little closer to actually writing it.

But again, the true power of this tactic stems from having someone else rely on you — so the more invested they are in the piece, the better. (And the more they care about you, the nicer their encouragement will be!)

3. Genuine interest in a project

Now let’s talk intrinsic motivation, namely in the form of personal interest — basically, the simple idea
that being interested in something will make you want to write about it more. The key here is that you don’t have to be an expert or a fanatic in order to find something interesting about your subject!

Indeed, you can develop interest along the way — the more you research, the more interested you’ll become. If there’s one element of your subject matter that intrigues you more than the rest, dig into it. Even if this is only a blip in your final project, it will increase your motivation to complete it. And once you tap into your own enthusiasm, it will shine through in the prose.

On that note, you can also try rousing your enthusiasm for the act of writing itself. You might challenge yourself to match the tone of a certain work or the style of another writer. You could also set yourself a specific task, like coming up with evocative metaphors or a personal anecdote to back up your argument. The more fun you have with this, the more your readers will too!

The good news is, if you’re publishing a book, you should already have seeds of intrinsic motivation ready to sprout. Presumably, you started writing because your interest in a subject or story made you want to share it with the world. Even just reminding yourself of this could be all you need to reignite your creativity.

4. Altering my physical state or setting


Once again, this concept is pretty simple: if you’ve fallen into a slump, a physical shock to your system can trigger a similar mental response. I’m using the phrase “shock to your system” a bit loosely here — it can be something uncomfortable, like splashing icy water on your face, but it can easily be another physical change that spurs your brain into action.

For me, what I try depends on how I’m feeling. If I’m just a bit hazy, listening to a catchy song or opening the window for some fresh air might do the trick. If I’m really tired, I might require a strong cup of coffee or a few jumping jacks.

And on the other hand, if I’m feeling anxious or intimidated, I’ll do something to calm myself down. Breathing exercises can help, as can a brisk walk. I’ve also had some success writing with a glass of wine in hand — if this is an option for you, it may relieve some of the psychological blockages that often accompany writing. (“Write drunk, edit sober” is obviously not universally good advice, so do take it with a pinch of salt.) 

Finally, if these stimuli don’t work, you can alter your entire environment: go to the library, a coffee shop, or wherever else you can write. You might be risking distraction by leaving your office cocoon, but if you weren’t getting work done anyway, you have nothing to lose!

5. A deadline with serious consequences

For my last trick, I’ll circle back to basics. Sometimes the only thing in the world that can get me to
write is a looming deadline — and the more real the consequences for missing it, the better.
 

This is easy to implement at work, where consequences may include: colleagues’ judgment, bosses’ lectures, and possibly even losing your job. It’s trickier to impose a deadline on yourself for a personal project… but again, as with everything else in this post, it’s not impossible.

You can join a writers’ group with a critique circle, most of which have time-sensitive guidelines. You can enter writing contests and submit to literary magazines with deadlines. You can even try to get a book deal in advance of actually finishing the book — though I personally wouldn’t recommend this strategy!

Indeed, take what you will from these motivational tips, whether you follow them to the letter or interpret them through your own lens. I only hope you’re able to finally vanquish your own procrastination demons and write freely, whatever that means to you.


Savannah Cordova is a writer with Reedsy, a marketplace that connects self-publishing authors with the world’s best editors, designers, and marketers. In her spare time, Savannah enjoys reading contemporary fiction, listening to audiobooks, and writing short stories.

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Should Women Rule the World? By Guest Author @JennyTwist1

 

We have virtually no evidence for what human society was like in prehistory. Palaeolithic cave paintings depict animals but very few humans. There are patterns made by human hands and the occasional stick figure but nothing to give us a clear picture of how these societies were arranged.

Did we, for instance, take lifelong partners and live in small family groups? If our nearest relatives, the great apes, are anything to go by, our ancestors most likely had random sex with different partners. Until, that is, human beings made the connection between sex and the creation of new life.

I argued in a previous article (https://manicscribbler.blogspot.com/2017/06/the-earth-mother-rules-guest-author.html) that the earliest societies were not only matrilineal (which makes perfect sense in a society where everybody knows who their mother is and fathers don’t exist) but matriarchal.

It is interesting to speculate what these societies were like and how they compare with the patriarchal societies which followed.

For a start, there seems to have been nothing we would describe as war in the Palaeolithic age. Surely there must have been disagreements and tussles but nothing our ancestors felt worthy of recording in paintings. In fact, we don’t see definite evidence until the late Neolithic, well after the ancient matriarchal societies have been suppressed.

This doesn’t, of course, prove that rule by women is more benign than rule by men. It could be simply that warfare only emerged as the human population increased so much that resources became scarce. That war was, if you like, inevitable, irrespective of the nature of government.

As for women leaders being naturally more nurturing and non-violent we know that this is not universal. Some of the most memorable women rulers were every bit as cruel and despotic as their male counterparts, Catherine the Great, for example, or our own dear Margaret Thatcher, who certainly had no aversion to war.

What we can say, with reasonable confidence, is that war on any significant scale did not exist before patriarchal government became the norm.

The discovery that men had an equal role in the creation of children led to a fundamental change in stone age societies. The only way of ensuring that a man’s woman (or women) only gave birth to his children was to strictly control her sexual activity. Now that women had been stripped of their magic they no longer had the power to resist men’s superior physical strength, and so women, rather than being the magical creators of life, were to become mere vessels for the incubation of the seed of men.

Quite apart from the obvious loss of quality of life that brought, it meant women, far from being the rulers of these societies, no longer even had a voice. Virtually all human societies since the stone age have been ruled by men, for men. The struggle for equality has been going on for thousands of years and is still a long way from reaching its goal.

And today, watching a video of policemen kneeling on a helpless woman, I find myself wondering about the Genesis myth. Poor Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, innocent of sin, beguiled by the serpent into eating the forbidden fruit. What was the secret knowledge that was imparted to them? Not, surely, that they were naked and should be ashamed. If God created them naked, what could be shameful about it?

Could it be that the knowledge that caused them to be expelled from Paradise was the understanding of how children were conceived, which passed  the power to men?

 


 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/dec/12/humans-were-not-centre-stage-ancient-cave-art-painting-lascaux-chauvet-altamira

 About the Author:

Jenny Twist was born in York and brought up in the West Yorkshire mill town of Heckmondwike, the eldest grandchild of a huge extended family.

She left school at fifteen and went to work in an asbestos factory. After working in various jobs, including bacon-packer and escapologist’s assistant (she was The Lovely Tanya), she returned to full-time education and did a BA in history, at Manchester and post-graduate studies at Oxford.

She stayed in Oxford working as a recruitment consultant for many years and it was there that she met and married her husband, Vic.

In 2001 they retired and moved to Southern Spain where they live with their rather eccentric dogs and cat. Besides writing, she enjoys reading, knitting and attempting to do fiendishly difficult logic puzzles.

Since moving to Spain she has written four novels and numerous short stories.

In July 2018 she was awarded the coveted TOP FEMALE AUTHOR award in Fantasy/Horror/Paranormal/Science Fiction by The Authors Show.  

Friday, April 9, 2021

Released: A Measure of Madness by @KimMcMahill

I would like to thank Lynette for hosting me once again on her blog so soon. I last visited a couple months ago and discussed the Progression of a Series, specifically my Risky Research Series. In that post I mentioned the upcoming April 9, 2021 release of the fourth installment in the series, A Measure of Madness. I would also like to mention that I also recently released a prequel micro-read to the series, Midnight in Montana, which is free to download from the usual sources. But for now, here’s a bit more on the latest novel, A Measure of Madness.


After a Washington, D.C. fundraiser exposes members of Coterie, a deadly organization that has been manipulating the diet and nutrition industries, the pursuit by FBI agent Devyn Nash heats up. The FBI locates the mastermind behind Coterie in Puerto Rico, but despite help from local agents, their attempt to bring him in results in a shootout that sends Coterie’s members scrambling for cover, Devyn’s partner fighting for his life, and Devyn more determined than ever to bring them to justice. Her decision to pursue the head of Coterie to Brazil puts her job and her relationship with Wyoming Sheriff, Gage Harris, in jeopardy, but she is unwilling to allow those responsible for so much death to live out their lives in paradise.

Excerpt

Devyn did as ordered as tears streamed down her checks. She felt like a coward running, but knew it was retreat or die.

Bullets rained around her as she ran in a zig-zag pattern, trying to avoid being hit. She had almost reached the truck when a bullet grazed her ankle, sending her tumbling to the ground. She scrambled to her feet. Fueled with adrenaline, she ignored the pain as she hobbled the last twenty feet to the truck.

Sliding into the driver’s seat, she locked the doors and fished the keys out of her pocket. She dared a glance back. Sofia was still firing at Ramon and J.R., but was clearly too far gone to get off an accurate shot. But she had effectively given Devyn the time she needed to get to the truck.

As Sofia’s arm lowered, J.R. walked toward her. He knelt on the ground and placed his lips to hers for a long and tender moment. He then slowly rose to his feet and pointed the gun at Sofia.

Devyn couldn’t watch. She threw the truck into reverse and hit the gas. The truck’s tire’s spun and skidded on the dirt and gravel as she raced backwards until she reached a spot wide enough to turn around. Cranking the wheel hard, she spun the vehicle and barreled toward BR-116.

About the Author

Kim McMahill grew up in Wyoming which is where she developed her sense of adventure and love of the outdoors. She started out writing non-fiction, but her passion for exotic world travel, outrageous adventures, stories of survival, and happily-ever-after endings soon drew her into a world of romantic suspense and adventure fiction. Along with writing novels Kim has also published over eighty travel and geographic articles, and contributed to a travel story anthology. She has had the opportunity to live in Hawaii, New Mexico, South Dakota, Iowa, and Colorado, but has finally returned home to Wyoming. When not writing she enjoys gardening, traveling, hiking, puzzles, playing games, and spending time with family.

Connect with Kim at:

Kim's Blog

Follow Kim on Twitter 

Kim's Facebook Page

Find Kim on Instagram

Kim's Goodreads author page 

You can check out the Risky Research Series video trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZIRJ1s-Fo&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about the author or to purchase the Risky Research Series or other novels by Kim McMahill, visit her page on 

AmazonUK

or 

 AmazonUS

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

The Seal's Temptation by Jacquie Biggar (@JacqBiggar) Blog Tour & Giveaway

 

The SEAL's Temptation
Wounded Hearts Book 7
by Jacquie Biggar
Genre: Romantic Suspense
DEA Agent Maggie Holt knows about Hell...
After eighteen months undercover in a Mexican cartel, Maggie is broken. The kickass agent she once was, is gone, leaving her riddled with guilt and nightmares. Forced to take paid leave, Maggie accepts the offer of a vacation on the ranch of the man who’d rescued her from an almost certain death.
Frank Stein knows the signs of PTSD, he’d suffered the symptoms himself as Chief Petty Officer of SEAL Team Five. Honorably retired from duty, Frank has found peace at the family ranch and hopes it will do the same for Magdalena. Ever since he’d first met her when she was interrogating his buddy, Jared, Frank has been fascinated by the raven-haired beauty and wants the chance to see where their relationship could go.
Adam O’Connor is Maggie’s partner. He knows her. He loved her once and could again, if she’d let him in. But he’s also angry she took the chances she did by going undercover against orders. And now, things are different. She’s different.
When a right-wing militia group infiltrates the area, will DEA Agent Maggie Holt, her partner, Adam O’Connor, and ex-SEAL Chief Frank Stein be able to set aside their differences to stop them before someone dies? And who will Maggie choose, the handsome cowboy, or her charismatic DEA partner?
**Only .99 cents!!**
**Check out the rest of the Wounded Hearts series here! **
USA Today bestselling author Jacquie Biggar loves to write Romantic Suspense novels brimming w/Attitude.
Jacquie Biggar is a USA Today bestselling author of romance who loves to write about tough, alpha males and strong, contemporary women willing to show their men that true power comes from love. She lives on Vancouver Island with her husband and loves to hear from readers all over the world!
In her own words: “My name is Jacquie Biggar. When I’m not acting like a total klutz I am a wife, mother of one, grandmother, and a butler to my calico cat. My guilty pleasure are reality tv shows like Amazing Race and The Voice. I can be found every Monday night in my armchair plastered to the television laughing at Blake and Adam’s shenanigans. I love to hang at the beach with DH (darling hubby) taking pictures or reading romance novels (what else?). I have a slight Tim Hortons obsession, enjoy gardening, everything pink and talking to my friends.”
Follow the tour HERE for special content and a giveaway!
$20 Amazon

Sunday, March 7, 2021

Back to School/College/Uni and Need a Helping Hand?

I know the Internet is flooded with websites, blogs and how-to pages offering information on multiple subjects, but what percentage of this is reliable?  Most teachers warn students not to rely on the Internet if they want accurate information, but instead to use reputable books and journals written by experts in their fields.  However, most students would much rather turn to the Internet, because of its immediacy and ease of access.

The same goes for authors needing to research various topics – in fact, as an author myself, I wonder how any of us ever managed before we had the Internet.  I imagine many consulted encyclopaedias, thesauri, or made regular trips to their local library to spend hours browsing the shelves in search of the information they needed. 

http://clipartmag.com/google-clipart
I first began writing when I lived abroad in the pre-Internet age, and had to make frequent trips to the British Council Library, searching through outdated tomes to verify information I needed for my first story.  And when I was a student, I spent a great deal of time in the university library for every coursework essay assigned.  Now I click on Google and a world of information is presented to me in a second.  Talk about spoilt for choice.

However, there is a website packed with free resources that may not appear immediately in your Google search, unless you phrase your search in a particular way.  It is intrinsically a homework help site where students can seek help from professional tutors on virtually any subject that exists. But what this site also offers is a vast list of subject pages teeming with essays and articles all written by experts in their fields, so the information is unique and absolutely reliable, not to mention completely free.

The site is 24HourAnswers.com, and clicking on this link will take you to its huge list of subject pages.  Scroll down to find the subject that interests you and click on that to produce an extensive array of sub-categories.  For example, click on the subject Writing, followed by the sub-category Grammar and you will call up a page covering a wide range of issues from the correct use of apostrophes to split-infinitives and beyond.  There is a comprehensive Literature section offering analysis of a variety of literary texts and a huge alphabetical glossary of literary terminology giving you the meaning of every term from Abridgement to Zeugma.

If you have a question about Mineralogy, just click on the Earth Science section; if you are studying any aspect of Business there are at least 40 business subjects to choose from, while if you are preparing for exams, the Exam Prep section offers information and advice about all major exams and more.  And if you don’t find exactly what you want in any of these subject pages, each one offers links to other reliable sources on the Internet.  And it's all completely, absolutely FREE!

I think that's worth sharing, don’t you?



Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Why Can't a Woman be More Like a Man? By Guest Author @JennyTwist1

Welcome back guest author Jenny Twist with another amusing and thoughtful post.  If you enjoy it, why not check out some of her previous essays on this blog, including the ever-popular The Earth Mother Rules!:

Why Can't a Woman be More Like a Man?

By Nik Cyclist from Bangkok, Thailand -
Chaophraya River
 

We were lost in the back streets of Bangkok. The heat   was oppressive, the smell rising from the canals was   overpowering and what little street lighting there was   failed to illuminate more than a small circle around   each lamppost. It was all too easy to imagine sinister   oriental bandits lurking in every alleyway. I was, quite   frankly, terrified. 

 But my husband, supremely confident in his own   navigational skills, consulted his map, with the rather   dubious assistance of the nearest street lamp, then  triumphantly led us to the restaurant.

It beats me how he does it! To me maps bear only a passing resemblance to reality. Indeed, it seems whenever I have to consult one, reality is invariably upside-down or sideways.

My husband, like most men, seems to be constantly aware of where he is in relation to the rest of the world and is able to relate it to a larger picture. I, on the other hand, like most women, am only really aware of my position in familiar places. I know my home, my workplace, where I do the shopping, etc. and am familiar with the routes linking these places, but I have only the haziest idea of how they fit in with the larger reality.

It would appear that the ability to read maps is gender-related. Most men seem to be able to do it without difficulty. Most women prefer to use landmarks.

There are other abilities, too, which seem to me to be gender-related. Men can run fast and efficiently, throw balls straight and hard, park cars in small spaces. Women can multi-task, find things and empathise.

Of course we can all be trained to do any of those things, but it seems to me that there are inherent abilities which are stronger in one sex than the other.

Why should there be these differences and does it matter?

I think the reason for the differences is as old as mankind itself. Primitive man had little choice about division of labour. Since at any given time a significant proportion of the young women in the tribe would be pregnant or nursing, it must have been the men who did most or all of the hunting and it therefore made sense for the women to look after the homestead.

If we look at the skills required for the two tasks, we will see that they are quite different. To hunt effectively, you require a good understanding of a large area of territory and to know where you are within it. The ability to run fast and throw accurately goes without saying. And it is essential to be able to concentrate on the job in hand. The hunter can not afford to be distracted by his surroundings. He has to be able to focus on the job in hand. And he has to keep communication simple and unequivocal. It is essential that every word or hand signal has one meaning and one meaning only. It would be disastrous to interpret ‘Lion behind you!’ as ´Did you remember to bring the lunch?’

To run a homestead effectively, however, requires an entirely different set of skills. It is much more important to know your home area in great detail than it is to have an awareness of the territory around it. Ability to run and throw is of limited value. And, instead of focussing on one thing at a time, it is important to be aware of and controlling several things at once. Even a housewife in very primitive times would have several tasks running simultaneously - preparing food, watching the fire, supervising children, etc. As for communication, straightforward verbal language is fine for adults, but when it comes to dealing with children too young to have developed speech, it is very useful to be able to read their body language in order to understand what they need.

In other words, the human race has spent hundreds of thousands of years developing spatial skills in men and developing empathy in women. It is hardly surprising that these abilities persist in modern society, even though their relative usefulness is now less apparent.

It has, however, left us with a problem of communication between the sexes. Women are so used to reading and interpreting body language that not only do we regularly fail to understand when men miss our signals, but we have developed a whole system of communication which allows us to say one thing whilst meaning another.

Consider, for example, how a woman behaves when she is not feeling very well. She expects people
around her to be aware of this, without her having to spell it out for them. If somebody asks if she is feeling OK, she is very likely to reply, “Yes, I’m fine” leaving it to be understood that she is not fine, but being very brave about it. Another woman will see this immediately and sympathise. A man is very to likely to say, “That’s all right then” and walk out, leaving her frustrated and upset. She may well be left with the feeling that the man is insensitive and/or uncaring.

Although understandable, such a belief is unjust. It is not that men are insensitive or even that they are entirely illiterate in body language. Men can read signals, but they are generally less sure of themselves when it comes to interpreting and responding. The man in the example above is almost certainly aware that there is something wrong, but he has taken her reply to mean ‘I am not fine, but I don’t want to talk about it.’

This lack of communication is not only a shame and a misuse of what, after all, is a very valuable skill, but it can lead to quite dangerous misunderstandings. The propensity of women to say one thing when they mean another surely helps support the belief that when a woman says ‘no’, she means ‘yes’- used as a justification for rape throughout the ages.

Modern society has gone a long way towards dispelling that particular belief, but it has not done much to change the ways of thinking that led to its development in the first place.

I am not suggesting for one moment that either sex should adopt the other’s method of communication. But we could each understand how the other works and perhaps learn to employ a little of the other’s skills.

Empathy is extremely useful for identifying problems, but it is unspecific and open to misinterpretation. So we need verbal language to augment our understanding.

If women want men to respond sympathetically, then we need to be a bit more precise. If, instead of saying ‘Fine’, we said, ‘No, I’m feeling awful and I could do with a hug,’ we would be much more likely to get the right response.

And my advice to the poor Henry Higgins’s of this world, who remain baffled by their inability to understand women, would be - ‘Just give them a hug anyway. Nine times out of ten you’ll be right.’



About the Author:

Jenny Twist was born in York and brought up in the West Yorkshire mill town of Heckmondwike, the eldest grandchild of a huge extended family.

She left school at fifteen and went to work in an asbestos factory. After working in various jobs, including bacon-packer and escapologist’s assistant (she was The Lovely Tanya), she returned to full-time education and did a BA in history, at Manchester and post-graduate studies at Oxford.

She stayed in Oxford working as a recruitment consultant for many years and it was there that she met and married her husband, Vic.

In 2001 they retired and moved to Southern Spain where they live with their rather eccentric dogs and cat. Besides writing, she enjoys reading, knitting and attempting to do fiendishly difficult logic puzzles.

Since moving to Spain she has written four novels and numerous short stories.

In July 2018 she was awarded the coveted TOP FEMALE AUTHOR award in Fantasy/Horror/Paranormal/Science Fiction by The Authors Show.  

Why Can't a Woman be More Like a Man? was first published in An Open Letter to Stephen King and Other Essays (2014).




 


Friday, February 19, 2021

Progression of a Series by Guest Author @KimMcMahill

I know many readers love to know that when they've finished a great novel, they don't have to say goodbye to their favourite characters, and I've always admired authors who have the vision to plan a whole series of novels along with the skill and dedication to write them.  One such author is Kim McMahill, and I'm delighted to welcome her to my blog to share some of the secrets involved in series writing.  So enough from me, let me hand you over to Kim:

"There are many reasons to love a series. A series gives the reader the opportunity to really get to know the characters on a personal level. We get to see the recurring protagonists and antagonists progress emotionally, evolve into better or worse people, and sometimes we see them grow old. We may even connect to the characters as we share some of the same personal experiences—a challenge at work, a bully, a crisis of faith, a health issue, or relationship woes or wows.

"I started my Risky Research Series with a clear vision of how the series would develop and end, but I soon realized I may not be in total control. When, and if, FBI agent Devyn Nash dismantles a deadly organization obsessed with controlling the multi-billion-dollar diet product industry and brings them to justice, she still has more to accomplish. Will her next case be strong enough to carry the series past nabbing Coterie? Will she still have a job with the FBI after A Measure of Madness? Honestly, I’m not sure yet, but in the mean time she has some very dangerous individuals to track down.

"The series begins with A Dose of Danger when a call to FBI agent Devyn Nash from Wyoming Sheriff Gage Harris exposes connections between a string of crimes occurring across the country, drawing the FBI into the investigation. Book 2, A Taste of Tragedy, brings them closer to the killers and to Nick’s ex-wife as they follow clues involving a deadly sweetener to Arizona. In book 3, A Foundation of Fear, Devyn closes in on one member of Coterie in Washington D.C. at a political fundraiser, allowing the reader to get inside the head of an assassin.

"In the fourth installment of the Risky Research series, A Measure of Madness, the FBI locates the mastermind behind Coterie, but attempts to bring him in result in a shootout that sends Coterie’s members scrambling for cover. And, when Devyn’s partner is left fighting for his life in a Puerto Rican hospital, she becomes more determined than ever to bring them to justice. A Measure of Madness, will be released on April 9, 2021.

"Will there be a book 5? Since Devyn still has a promise to keep and she needs to figure out what to do about the handsome sheriff who has stolen her heart, it’s likely, so stay tuned."

So there we have it.  It sounds very much like this series has a little longer to run, and readers won't be saying Goodbye to Devyn just yet.  Thank you, Kim.

About the Author

Kim McMahill grew up in Wyoming which is where she developed her sense of adventure and love of the outdoors. She started out writing non-fiction, but her passion for exotic world travel, outrageous adventures, stories of survival, and happily-ever-after endings soon drew her into a world of romantic suspense and adventure fiction. Along with writing novels Kim has also published over eighty travel and geographic articles, and contributed to a travel anthology and cookbook. When not writing she enjoys gardening, traveling, hiking, and spending time with family. Connect with Kim at:

Kim's Blog 

Follow Kim on Twitter 

Kim's Facebook Page

Find Kim on Instagram

Kim's Goodreads author page 

Learn more about the Risky Research Series by checking out the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clZIRJ1s-Fo&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about the author or to purchase the Risky Research Series or other novels by Kim McMahill visit her page on:

 AmazonUK 

Amazon US